The Coolest eProduction Stuff I Could Find

In which I learn a fixed-width EPUB previewing workflow from an expert, and the CSS Regions demo makes my jaw drop.

Between the technical sessions, I spoke with a woman from the audience who had answered an iBooks question. It turns out she works for Apple, and kindly shared her fixed-width EPUB proofing workflow with me. I haven’t tried it yet, if you try it, let me know how it works!

<!– thanks to everyone for the feedback, steps have been updated 6.3 –>

  1. In the CSS, define dimensions for the body. Its easiest if these dimensions match the viewport dimensions. Also define a border on the body. This will outline the page, making it easier to place the elements on the page. Remove this border before publishing the book. body { width: 400px; height: 300px; border: thin solid red;}
  2. Once everything is previewing well in Safari on the desktop, preview in Safari on the iPad simulator. You shouldn’t need to change much if anything in this step. iOS Simulator is part of XCode and is available from developer.apple.com and and the Mac App store, free to registered developers and 4.99 from the App store. Note, Mac OS X 10.6.6 is  required. (I will have to skip this step until I’m ready for a system upgrade)
  3. Finally, load the EPUB into iBooks. If you need to make iterations, change the title of the book to circumvent iBook’s cacheing.
The Future of EPUB session was eye candy.
IDPF is moving the EPUB standard forward trying to balance accessibility and the high standards of magazine creative directors with input from DAISY and IDEAlliance.
One application of adding metadata to parts of magazines would be to repurpose content. For instance, a retrospective book with all articles and images about a celebrity would be quick and relatively easy to create from an archive of digital magazines with metadata at the article level. (especially if the article is structured and uses stylesheets consistently)

Complex layouts with reflowable text and JavaScript interaction.

Take THAT custom apps!

CSS 3 Regions from Adobe looks fabulous. This article from Adobe explains further, and the WebKit-based prototype is available for download.
Any suggestions for explaining to my business partner why I can’t do billable work because I’m geeking out playing with CSS3 Regions?

So Are Publishers Making Any Money with this Ebook Thing?

The session in which three publishers talked about process, discipline, waltzing and the vise. (Not vice)

Liisa McCloy Kelly from Random House said that making an EPUB before EPUB 3 was “like waltzing with both hands tied behind your back and a weight on one foot.” (I think of it more as Tarantella in the dark while the stage shifts constantly underfoot) She said that Random House has 5 different eBook processes, the most complex of which requires teams of product managers, HTML coders, designers, R&D and testing. She recommends encouraging designers to keep an eye on digital conversion, to think about variable sizes.

Bob Young of Lulu stated that the core value of the internet is that it connects everyone of us to everyone else. (Mostly true, but I worry about the digital divide. More tech in libraries!) The role of publishers, he went on to say, is to match people with something interesting to say with people who want to hear it.

Ken Brooks of Cengage Learning was all business. Publishers are caught in a vise, as less cash for operations meets lower profits from products. Efficiently managing process, vendors, and technology is key. If each new project requires a different flow of process, you’re dying the death of a thousand cuts. It’s better to determine one or two ways to work, and have the discipline to stick to them, “ruthless management of complexity and standards is more efficient.”

How do you determine which projects to tackle? You aim for projects that are low in complexity and costs and high in payback, and he put up a great chart:

How to Determine Which Projects to Pursue

A loose interpretation

This is a good way to visualize this common sense approach. But in this new and rapidly evolving marketplace, where do you get the data? Perhaps the scarcity of data prompted these pieces of advice also:

-Brooks recommends that we start with the end in mind, and work incrementally rather than wholesale.
-And stick to standards. “Standards represent our collective experience, you might as well benefit from what other people know.