So Are Publishers Making Any Money with this Ebook Thing?

The session in which three publishers talked about process, discipline, waltzing and the vise. (Not vice)

Liisa McCloy Kelly from Random House said that making an EPUB before EPUB 3 was “like waltzing with both hands tied behind your back and a weight on one foot.” (I think of it more as Tarantella in the dark while the stage shifts constantly underfoot) She said that Random House has 5 different eBook processes, the most complex of which requires teams of product managers, HTML coders, designers, R&D and testing. She recommends encouraging designers to keep an eye on digital conversion, to think about variable sizes.

Bob Young of Lulu stated that the core value of the internet is that it connects everyone of us to everyone else. (Mostly true, but I worry about the digital divide. More tech in libraries!) The role of publishers, he went on to say, is to match people with something interesting to say with people who want to hear it.

Ken Brooks of Cengage Learning was all business. Publishers are caught in a vise, as less cash for operations meets lower profits from products. Efficiently managing process, vendors, and technology is key. If each new project requires a different flow of process, you’re dying the death of a thousand cuts. It’s better to determine one or two ways to work, and have the discipline to stick to them, “ruthless management of complexity and standards is more efficient.”

How do you determine which projects to tackle? You aim for projects that are low in complexity and costs and high in payback, and he put up a great chart:

How to Determine Which Projects to Pursue

A loose interpretation

This is a good way to visualize this common sense approach. But in this new and rapidly evolving marketplace, where do you get the data? Perhaps the scarcity of data prompted these pieces of advice also:

-Brooks recommends that we start with the end in mind, and work incrementally rather than wholesale.
-And stick to standards. “Standards represent our collective experience, you might as well benefit from what other people know.

Advertisements