Just start doing what you know how to do and innovate around that.

Greg Bear and Neal Stephenson of Subutai explain the natural progression from hand-to-hand combat to innovative publishing business model.

An interest in antique weaponry and a forgotten tradition of western hand-t0-hand combat led science fiction author Greg Bear to the theme and story line of the Mongoliad project. On the way, he and his partners developed PULP,  the “Personal Ubiquitous Literary Platform.” PULP is is billed as connected publishing, and in their keynote session, Bear and Stephenson contended that content as service is the only viable business model when piracy is ubiquitous: “create an experience that can’t be pirated.”

After finding a funding partner and business mentor, (and fellow antique weapon enthusiast), Bear and Stephenson began creating an online experience with serialized content. Members and fans are encouraged to contribute writing and art, all consistent with the “canon,” the settings and characters originally developed by the writers.

At first the main access to the Mongoliad was on the web, but now, one subscription price allows readers (fans? users? community members? mongols?) to use any device for access.

PULP uses open source components for quicker updates and expansion, and hosts the service in Amazon Cloud the which had a famous failure recently. Even with those efficiencies, Neal Stephenson admitted that “easy to use is hard to do.”

With the PULP platform, it seems Subutai would like us all to make a connected publishing community. The website states: “PULP transforms fiction into franchise by building bridges between publishers, fans, artists, and the stories, characters, and universes that help them define themselves.” Just add a great story, some ads, a wiki, fan fic and fan art. As the Subutai team said, “Each book is a micro business venture.”

Addendum 5/30/11: Paul Biba wrote a great review of this session:
http://www.teleread.com/paul-biba/idpf-annual-meeting-keynote-the-mongoliad-year-one/